The Difference Between Bootfoot and Stockingfoot Waders

Mar 4th 2020

The Difference Between Bootfoot and Stockingfoot Waders

If you need to enter the water for long periods when you go fishing or hunting, waders are essential. They keep you dry, comfortable, and safe from excessive exposure to the water and any of the substances and particles that it may contain. There are two main types of waders you can choose from, namely bootfoot and stockingfoot versions. Read on to learn the difference.

Bootfoot

A bootfoot wader is a wader that has the boots permanently connected to the legs of the wader body. Bootfoot waders have several differences from stockingfoot waders. For one, bootfoot waders can be quicker and easier to put on and take off since the one-piece construction lets you quickly slide in and out of them. With bootfoot waders, you don’t have to purchase and carry separate boots on your next outdoor adventure since the boots are already connected to the wader. This makes the purchase of bootfoot waders a convenient, economical value over stockingfoot waders. Bootfoot waders are typically made with some type of insulation in the boot area, keeping your feet comfortable during those cold days. Bootfoot waders do have to be hand-washed and air-dried, though, since you can’t throw them into your washing machine.

Stockingfoot

Stockingfoot waders do not include boots, which you will need to buy and put on separately. As a result, they’re much more customizable; you can get the exact fit and specs that you need or prefer. While stockingfoot waders have general sizing (small, medium, large, etc.), you can find wader boots in numerical sizes, like regular footwear. Since you buy the waders and boots separately, you have greater room for customization based on your individual sizing needs. You can purchase boots that have different kinds of soles, a particular material construction or unique outsole tread pattern. This allows you to change your wader set-up depending on the different environments you visit. Make sure to check your local laws as some areas do not allow felt bottom boots in their stream beds. Since stockingfoot waders are used with separate wading boots, it allows for an easier range of movement. Should you have to walk a long distance to the body of water you’re targeting, stockingfoot waders, paired the right wading boots, are the preferred choice for movement and comfort. Stockingfoot waders should be hand-washed and air-dried.

Now that you know the benefits and trade-offs of both wader types, you’re ready to make the best decision when buying one. Whether you need bootfoot or stockingfoot waterproof waders, you can find the perfect pair here at Waders.com. Feel free to call us if you have any questions.

ALL PRICES ARE IN USD. © 2018 WADERS.COM.
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